What sorts on psychiatry

Here are a few What sorts posts on psychiatry

Does anyone remember “lobotomy”?

Is your dog on prozac?

Marcia Angell on Big Pharma

NYT on DSM-V

Defending Electroshock

What sorts of people?  Empathy deficit disorder–do you suffer from it?

Pride in maddness–the new visibility

Emi Koyama explains why she is suspicious of bioethics

Emi Koyama just posted a really great article on the Bioethics Forum site reviewing a research practice of intersex fetus treatment using a synthetic hormone and the Ashley case. She says, “I am starting to question seriously what role bioethics and bioethicists play in medical controversies involving children who cannot make decisions for themselves, and parents, especially mothers, who are forced to make the decision under complicated social, cultural and economic circumstances” and “After all, what is the relevance of risk/benefit analysis when the intended goal is unethical?”

http://www.thehastingscenter.org/Bioethicsforum/Post.aspx?id=4492

Emi writes toward the end of her wonderful article, “I trust many of these scholars and their judgment. But that was how I felt about the disability theorists who were part of the working group that ended up helping to polish up growth attenuation as a legitimate treatment.”

That reminds me. I have a small piece of advice for anyone who has a chance to read Dr. Adrienne Asch’s commentary to the Diekema & Fost AJOB article. Please don’t miss the footnote on Page 46. Dr. Asch is a member of the Seattle Growth Attenuation and Ethics Working Group and signed the group’s statement that claimed growth attenuation to be ethically admissible for severely disabled children in general without court orders, something Dr. Wilfond called “a compromise” the group had reached. But Dr. Asch explains in the footnote that she signed it because she “supported the process through which the statement was produced” and not because she supported all its conclusion. But normally, signing a document means that you support its contents including the conclusion, whatever process there was in its production. And whatever excuse you might have. This footnote leaves me really curious about what happened in the working group discussions.

On some misinformation in Dr. Lantos’ marvelous commentary to the Diekema & Fost article

I just read “It’s Not the Growth Attenuation. It’s the Sterilization!” , Dr. Lantos’ commentary to the AJOB article “Ashley Revisited” by Dr. Diekema and Dr. Fost. Dr. Lantos virtually pointed out the fact that the doctors’ justification has been full of deceptions. It’s the fact that I have been documenting in my blog and I’m so glad that someone officially wrote in an academic journal about “the bizarre opaqueness” of their supposedly scientific articles. Here,  I just want to point out two pieces of misinformation I found in his commentary. I think at least one of them leads us to a serious question surrounding the 2007 agreement between the hospital and WPAS. Continue reading

Dr. Diekema is going to speak about the Ashley case again in April

Dr. Diekema is among the plenary speakers in the following pediatric ethics conference in Cleveland.  He is going to speak about the Ashley case  in one of the breakout sessions on April 22. “Ethics Concults and Institutional Interests: The Ashley Case.” He will also speak in another breakout session on the next day about withholding and withdrawing fluids and nutrition.

the Pediatric Ethics 2010:Advancing the Interests of Children

April 22-24, 2010

You will find the program details here.

Living Archives on Eugenics in Western Canada

From Express News, University of Alberta:

Provincial eugenics archives awarded one of two SSHRC Awards

Robert Wilson

Robert Wilson


February 10, 2010 – (Edmonton) On Feb. 4, the federal government announced nearly a $1 million each over six years for two University of Alberta-led projects aimed at bringing communities and universities together to build knowledge on areas affecting Canadians.

Robert Wilson, professor in the Department of Philosophy, was awarded $1 million in a community-university research alliances grant by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada to fund his project titled “Living Archives on Eugenics in Western Canada.”  Read the rest here