Future Past: Disability, Eugenics, and Brave New Worlds

This is the first of three panel discussions at the Future Past: Disability, Eugenics, and Brave New Worlds symposium hosted by the Paul K. Longmore Institute on Disability at San Francisco State University. This panel covers the WHAT? giving an overview of the symposium’s focus: the history of eugenics movements in North America, and why they are disturbingly relevant today.

Presenters: Alexandra Minna Stern, Marcy Darnovsky, Glenn Sinclair, Nicola Fairbrother

If you are interested in watching more panels from this symposium, please visit:

Conference – The Inclusive Museum – Of Interest to What Sorts Folk

SECOND INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON THE INCLUSIVE MUSEUM
University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia
8-11 July 2009
http://www.Museum-Conference.com

At this time of fundamental social change, what is the role of the museum, both as a creature of that change, and perhaps also as an agent of change? The International Conference on the Inclusive Museum is a place where museum practioners, researchers, thinkers and teachers can engage in discussion on the historic character and future shape of the museum. The key question of the Conference is ‘How can the institution of the museum become more inclusive?’

Plenary speakers include:
*Stephane Martin, President, Ensemble Intercontemporain; CEO, Musée du quai Branly
*Alissandra Cummins, President of ICOM; Director, Barbados Museums and Historical Society, Barbados
*Kevin Gover, Director, Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of the American Indian, Washington, D.C., USA
*Adi Meretui Ratunabuabua, Principal Cultural Development Officer, Ministry of Fijian Affairs, Culture and Heritage and Regional Development, Fiji
*Dawn Casey, Director of the Powerhouse Museum, Sydney, Australia
*David Throsby, Professor of Economics, Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia
*Marcus Wood, Professor, University of Sussex, UK
*Craddock Morton, Director, National Museum of Australia; President, ICOM Australia
*Catherine Branson, President, Australian Human Rights Commission

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History of Medicine Days 2009 undergraduate and early postgraduate call for papers

If there are undergraduates or early postgraduate who have suitable stuff you should apply. I can be the Preceptor if you need one.

History of Medicine Days (HMD)

The History of Medicine Days are an annual two-day Nation-wide conference held at the University of Calgary in which undergraduate students from across Canada give 10-minute presentations on the history of medicine. The topic is broadly understood such as to include areas from Classic Studies, the History of Public Health, Nursing, Veterinary Medicine, Human Biology, Neuroscience, etc. Prizes are awarded and there are associated receptions and an awards banquet.

Each student is matched with a faculty preceptor who provides guidance for the preparation of the History of Medicine Days presentation and acts as a discussant and mentor for the student.

It is assumed and required that every student presentation provides some, even slight, original research attempt, new methodological perspective on the topic, and/or visibly critical discussion following from each presenter’s engagement with his or her topic. It is certainly possible and encouraged that 2-4 students present work on a related topic which may be included in panel form. An adequate critical discussant will then be identified by the conference organizers to comment on such related papers.

The History of Medicine Days Conference (HMDs) is held on a Friday/Saturday March 6 and Saturday, March 7

here the link

It has a keynote speaker

The Keynote Speaker, Professor Garland Allan (WUSL) will be co-sponsored by the Darwin Lecture Series, the History Department, and the Associate Dean for Undergraduate Medical Education. This exciting talk on eugenics, genetics and evolutionary medicine will be delivered on Friday, March 6, 2009 at 12:00 noon followed by an in-depth discussion. Please stay tuned for further details.

OUT FROM UNDER: Disability, History & Things to Remember

Until July 13, 2008
Out from Under: Disability, History and Things to Remember explores the history of disabled people in Canada. A display of thirteen diverse objects reveals a rich and nuanced story that pays tribute to the resilience, creativity, and the civic and cultural contributions of Canadians with disabilities.

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