Job whiners, remember that it could always be worse

Three gentlemen cleaning a cooperative elephant

Three men cleaning a cooperative elephant

What sorts of jobs should there be? All sorts?

Note to self: on the general theme of No Whining, one might be prompted to remember that however bad things are at work, there’s always someone worse off than you are. And they may have something to actually whine about.

Should we finish off with a round of Monty Python’s “Always look on the bright side of life”? Or is it, rather, “I Don’t Like Mondays” by the Rats?

Hat-tip to Rhett Strautins.

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5 thoughts on “Job whiners, remember that it could always be worse

  1. I was disappointed to see this photo posted to the blog as a source of humor. I think that in addition to the fact that this must be a form of humor that most appeals to young children or someone with a crude sensibility, the text that accompanies the photo suggests a hierarchy of, and elitism about, the kinds of employment people engage in: some of us are just too good for some jobs, for jobs like this. What do you see on the face of the man in the foreground? I read it as a look of disdain and reproach for the fascination and inspiration the photographer has displayed in wishing to capture this moment. In any case, I would have thought that a job that involved care of an animal which has earned a spot on endangered species lists should be widely regarded as personally rewarding, not to mention, ethically and socially responsible.

    I hope you will delete this post. It really lowers the standards of the blog.

  2. I was disappointed to see this comment posted to the blog as a sign of lack of humor. I think that in addition to the fact that this must be a form of lack of humor that most appeals to young children or someone with a crude sensibility, the subtext that accompanies the comment suggests a hierarchy of, and elitism about, the kinds of humour people engage in: some of us are just too good for some laughs, for laughs like this. What do you project onto the face of the man in the foreground? One might project onto it a look of disdain and reproach for the fascination and inspiration the photographer has displayed in wishing to capture this moment. In any case, one would have thought that a job that involved care of an animal which has earned a spot on endangered species lists should be widely regarded as personally rewarding, not to mention, ethically and socially responsible.

    I hope you will delete this comment. It really lowers the standards of the blog.

  3. I was recently putting together a powerpoint presentation for one of my classes and searching for images that represented (among other issues) world hunger and poverty. I came across a picture of a Sudanese man who, starving to death, had his face in the backside of a cow, eating the cow’s dung. I debated whether to include the image in my presentation; it was certainly provocative and starkly depicted the lived reality of many people in other parts of the globe. I ultimately decided not to do so, however, because the image and the reality it depicted were so disturbing, in fact haunted me for days, and I didn’t want to traumatize any of my students. But maybe it’s the kind of thing that you might enjoy and get a laugh out of. Would you like me to send it to you so that you can decide whether you wish to post it to the blog?

  4. Ah, Mr Chen,

    First thing’s first: there’s no need to use the term “asshole” on this blog! Especially not when there are a variety of other slurs–wacknoodle, skiff, fartsniffer, poindexter, etc.–that allow one to expand everyone’s horizons. And as the incredibly informative past discussion on this blog “Ableist language alternatives” (https://whatsortsofpeople.wordpress.com/2008/08/11/ableist-language-alternatives/) has made abundantly clear.

    But to the subtext of your message, and that photo that no doubt is the REAL source of the anxiety that has led you to revert to “asshole”. (I don’t know everything, true, but I do know enough to know that all that “troll stuff” is just subterfuge. You sneaky pimplesqueezer!) I know, at least now, that I should have acknowledged you when I posted the photo, and you are probably rightly pissed off for not being acknowledged for your efforts here in helping to remove that sore tooth from the elephant. But I wasn’t entirely sure, until now that it *was* you, but now that I look carefully, ever so much more carefully, I see from the boots that it *is* you, and when I cast my eye left I’m pretty sure I semi-recognize the fellow holding up the elephant’s trunk. (Is it really Timmy? If so, he’s really grown.) And Shelley may be right that the guy in the front does have a look of disdain, whereas I had assumed merely that he was anxious and uncomfortable, perhaps because he was next in line for the tooth extraction process. Silly me!

    But perhaps you can use your subject position to shed more light on this? I’m no semiotician, merely a philosopher in search of meaning, and I may have reached, if not exceeded, the limits of my hermeneutical skills.

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