Mental Illness and Leadership?

Below is a link to controversial interview in Maclean’s Magazine with Nassir Ghaemi about his new book A First-Rate Madness: Uncovering the Links Between Leadership and Mental Health.

http://www2.macleans.ca/2011/08/09/the-benefits-of-mental-illness-and-why-perfectly-normal-leaders-are-the-wrong-people-for-a-crisis/

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Accommodating Exam Anxiety

On the November 9 edition of The Current, there was a very interesting discussion about the accommodation of disabled students in universities.
The discussion centred on a recent case at the University of Manitoba.  Gábor Lukács, an assistant professor in the Mathematics Department, has gone to court to try to overturn the University’s decision to award a PhD to a student with extreme exam anxiety that he believes has not met the academic requirements for obtaining the degree. Continue reading

What sorts on psychiatry

Here are a few What sorts posts on psychiatry

Does anyone remember “lobotomy”?

Is your dog on prozac?

Marcia Angell on Big Pharma

NYT on DSM-V

Defending Electroshock

What sorts of people?  Empathy deficit disorder–do you suffer from it?

Pride in maddness–the new visibility

Pet pills, “ASD”, sexual morality, exclusion, and a fairytale

and not all five in one post, but each in its own, as I run 5 more posts from What sorts from roughly mid-2008 to early 2009.

Is your dog on Prozac?

Autism spectrum research and disability language alternatives

PZ Meyers on the enhancement of sexual morality: a modest proposal

The ethics of exclusion, the morality of abortion, and animals

A fairytale for my grandchildren

Marcia Angell on Big Pharma

From the latest NYRB, here’s the start of Marcia Angell’s review of three recent books on medicine and money, with a focus on psychiatry, DSM, and Big Pharma:

Recently Senator Charles Grassley, ranking Republican on the Senate Finance Committee, has been looking into financial ties between the pharmaceutical industry and the academic physicians who largely determine the market value of prescription drugs. He hasn’t had to look very hard.

Take the case of Dr. Joseph L. Biederman, professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School and chief of pediatric psychopharmacology at Harvard’s Massachusetts General Hospital. Thanks largely to him, children as young as two years old are now being diagnosed with bipolar disorder and treated with a cocktail of powerful drugs, many of which were not approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for that purpose and none of which were approved for children below ten years of age. Continue reading

NYT on DSM-V

A few snippets from Benedict Carey’s recent New York Times article Psychiatrists Revise the Book of Human Troubles on the ongoing revisions to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, expected to be published in 2012:

Is compulsive shopping a mental problem? Do children who continually recoil from sights and sounds suffer from sensory problems — or just need extra attention? Should a fetish be considered a mental disorder, as many now are? Panels of psychiatrists are hashing out just such questions, and their answers — to be published in the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders — will have consequences for insurance reimbursement, research and individuals’ psychological identity for years to come. The process has become such a contentious social and scientific exercise that for the first time the book’s publisher, the American Psychiatric Association, has required its contributors to sign a nondisclosure agreement.

You can read the whole article right here.