The Pistorius Story

There is now a nice pair of videos, running for just under 12 minutes, on Oscar Pistorius, made shortly before the Beijing Olympics, up on Youtube. They take the story up to the point where the Court for Arbitration in Sport overruled the initial IAFF decision banning him from competing with non-disabled athletes. For that decision, see Gregor Wolbring’s thoughts and related discussion in earlier posts here and here.

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Dr. Norman Fost’s latest comments on surrogacy

Dr. Norman Fost, who wrote two papers on the Ashley case and growth attenuation with Dr. Diekema this year, says on surrogacy in an article below, “It’s paternalistic to tell a competent woman how she can use her body, whether it’s to work in a coal mine or as a surrogate mother. “ He also says, “It’s not clear why that (commodification) would even be of any great consequences to the child if he or she is raised in a loving home.”

http://www.thedailypage.com/isthmus/article.php?article=27617

His comments on other issues such as savior sibling, steroid in sport are listed here. Continue reading

Training Elite Athletes

image002 The University of Alberta, Faculty of Rehabilitation Medicine , as part of their Distinguished Speaker Series is sponsoring a talk

Applied Research to support the paralympic wheelchair athlete for Beijing

By Dr. Vicky Tolfrey, Loughborigh University, United Kingdom

Thursday, October 22, 2009 at 5 PM

2- 39 Corbett Hall

Refreshments to Follow

Continue reading

Speedo Para-Swimming Championships

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The 2009 Speedo CAN-AM Para Swimming Championships are being held July 30-31, Aug 1 at the Kinsmen Sports Centre, Edmonton, AB.  Heats: 9:30 am – 12 pm; Finals: 4:30 pm – 8:30 pm.  Swimmers with a broad range of disabilities (functional, visual, and intellectual) will be attending from Canada, the United States, Australia, and Nigeria.  For more information on the competition check here.

Oscar Pistorius on his recent injuries

h/t to Media dis&dat

OUKSP-UK-OSSURRecent story in the Daily Mirror that starts:

Oscar Pistorius has told how a boating accident shattered his face and threatened his life – but will not stop him competing at next month’s BT Paralympic World Cup in Manchester

“Bladerunner” is back in training after the freak crash near Johannesburg in February which smashed an eye socket, his jaw, nose and two ribs.

Typical of a man who sprinted into the record books despite having both legs amputated below the knee before his first birthday, he views it as just another hurdle to overcome.

NY Times article: This Journey Began Before Starting Line

Photo of Nadine McNeil embracing her 18-year-old son, Tyler.  Nadine McNeil will compete in her fourth marathon, but it will be the first for Tyler.  Photo by Rob Bennett for the New York Times

By CHARLES WILSON

Published: October 31, 2008

Nadine McNeil will reach the crest of the Verrazano-Narrows Bridge on her handcycle soon after 7:30 Sunday morning. Moments later, she will roll swiftly past her 18-year-old son, Tyler, who is autistic. This will be her fourth marathon, and Tyler’s first. She has grown uneasy this week thinking of the moment when she will leave him behind.  “I can’t look back,” she said. “For 18 years, I’ve always known every moment where Tyler is. On Sunday, I won’t.”

Though joint parent-child appearances in the New York City Marathon are not uncommon — Rod Dixon, the race’s 1983 champion, is returning this year to run the race with his daughter — the path that brought Nadine, 42, and Tyler to the marathon is an unlikely one. Nadine had a stroke when she was 8 and lost the use of her right arm and her right leg. Tyler, her only child, is severely speech-delayed. Even now at 6 feet 4 inches, he communicates verbally by using one or two words at a time.

Nadine has poured her life into her son. Tyler, in turn, is what she calls “my right arm.” He compensates for her disabilities by tying her shoes. He does her buttons and zippers. If she tries to put on her coat, he will immediately rush to her side and gently lift her right arm into the sleeve.  Neither would have ever made it to this year’s starting line without the other.  Read the entire article here: http://www.nytimes.com/2008/11/01/sports/othersports/01marathon.html?th&emc=th

“Disability doesn’t mean Inability”

* For those in the NYC-area, this looks like a fabulous event

“Disability doesn’t mean Inability”
By: Emmanuel Yeboah, Athlete and Activist
 
 When:  Monday, October 27, 2008
 Where: NYU Pless Hall, First Floor Lounge
 82 Washington Square East
 New York, NY 10003
 Time:    6:00-8:30PM
 
 
Emmanuel Ofosu Yeboah was born in Ghana, with a deformed right leg and 
meager expectations. He was able to become self-sufficient in a 
society where the disabled (almost 10 percent of the population) are 
abandoned, shunned and hopeless.  To show his countrymen that 
disability doesn’t mean inability, he pedaled a bike donated by 
Challenged Athletes Foundation 610 km (379 miles) around Ghana using 
only his left leg. He continues to work vigorously to ensure that 
opportunities are available to all physically challenged Ghanaians.
 
Panel Discussion, Q & A, Wine & Cheese to follow
 
 
For questions please contact us at africa.house@nyu.edu