Love no matter what

An incredibly thought-provoking talk on identity, disability, love and parenting.

“what do we validate in our children and what do we cure in them?”

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It Gets Better

Dan Savage’s launch video for the It Gets Better Project.  An amazingly good video for its spontaneity, honesty, and message.  The project started as a response to a particular teen suicide case.  200 000 views in the last week, and counting …

No captions, though bits of the auto-captioning on Youtube works.  Sort of.

Human Kinds: Introduction

Over the next few weeks, we will run videocasts from in invited symposium panel that I organized at the Pacific Division meeting of American Philosophical Association in April, 2009, held in Vancouver. The panel was on human kinds, and topics that we discussed ranged from transhumanism through to disability and sub-normalcy and gay rights and gay marriage. The speakers, in the order in which they spoke, were:

Natasha Vita-More

Gregor Wolbring

Nick Agar

Ed Stein

The talks are relatively short, and we’ll run about 1 per week before linking them all up together. No captioning yet, but we hope to have captioning done by the time the series has run.

The introduction talks a little bit more generally about the panel and the What Sorts Network. You can also watch the videos directly on Youtube, by searching for videos by Rapunzelish. Really.

Keith Olbermann on California’s Proposition 8

We’ve been under the cone of silence over the many propositions passed as part of the US election season. But this one pretty much speaks for itself (though apologies that I have not found a version of this that is captioned–if anyone knows of one, let me know and I’ll link to that version.)

h/t Feministe

ACTUP Oral History Project

 

silence = death

silence = death

This week we had a real treat in Edmonton in having Sarah Schulman from the ACTUP Oral History Project around for the week. ACTUP–the AIDS Coalition To Unleash Power–was the leading activist organization in the US formed to fight on behalf of those with a then-mysterious “gay disease” in the early 1980s that came to be known as AIDS. The Oral History Project has been underway for over five years, and is centred on almost 100 video interviews, one with each living member of ACTUP, New York. The interviews, which run up to 4 hours, can be accessed via the OHP website. There you can view about 5 minutes of streaming video of the 70 or so interviews that have been posted there, and download FULL transcripts of all of these in pdf. Continue reading